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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

1 edition of Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates found in the catalog.

Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates

annotated bibliography

by United States. Bureau of Land Management

  • 296 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by [publisher not identified] in Place of publication not identified] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mule deer,
  • Habitat,
  • Effect of habitat modification on,
  • Fragmented landscapes,
  • Modification,
  • Bibliography,
  • Ungulates,
  • Habitat (Ecology)

  • Edition Notes

    Works primarily pertain to the western United States; possibly compiled by the Bureau of Land Management in Denver, Colo.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL737.U4 E34 2001
    The Physical Object
    Pagination14 leaves ;
    Number of Pages14
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26192114M
    OCLC/WorldCa957272431

    HABITAT FRAGMENTATION AND THE EFFECTS OF ROADS ON WILDLIFE AND HABITATS Background and Literature ReviewCompiled by Mark L. Watson, Habitat Specialist Conservation Services Division New Mexico Department of Game and Fish January Some studies have focused on the effects of habitat fragmentation caused by road networks that impede migration (Alexander and Walters , Frair et al. ). In other areas, however, a mixture of anthropogenic features, including roads, residential, oil and natural gas extraction, and highways, prompting ungulates to potentially respond in Cited by: 8.

    changing habitats. No other single factor has such an overriding effect on this species. Mule deer are ruminant animals. Like other deer, mule deer are primarily browsers. Although they will eat forbs and grasses, especial-ly nitrogen-rich new growth, they rely on shrubs and trees for much of their diets. Ruminant animals have. Effects of Mule Deer and Bison on Regeneration of Island Scrub Oak on Santa Catalina Island, California1 Thad A. Manuwal2 and Rick A. Sweitzer2 Abstract Islands commonly harbor unique species that are particularly susceptible to damage by introduced organisms. Historically, no large ungulates existed on Santa Catalina Island, but.

    by increasing levels of anthropogenic disturbance [4,5]. Threats to. remaining long-distance migration of ungulates include energy. development, tourism, urban sprawl, highway mortality, and. habitat fragmentation [6]. If traditional migration routes are. blocked or impeded, individuals may not be able to modify their. Mitigating roadway impacts to migratory mule deer-A case study with underpasses and continuous fencing Traffic collisions involving deer and other ungulates in Europe and available measures for mitigation. By Proceedings of the International Conference on Habitat Fragmentation, Infrastructure and the role of Ecological Engineering, 17 Cited by:


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Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates by United States. Bureau of Land Management Download PDF EPUB FB2

Title = {Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates: annotated bibliography. copyright = {Not provided. Contact Contributing Library. Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates: annotated bibliography by United States.

Bureau of Land ManagementPages: Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates: annotated : United States.

Bureau of Land Management. Effects of disturbances and habitat fragmentation on mule deer and other ungulates: annotated bibliography.

Effects of Underburning on Habitat Use of around 40% and create forest edge may benefit mule deer in south‐central Oregon and other forested ecosystems, particularly if these prescriptions.

EFFECTS OF HIGHWAYS ON MULE DEER Highways affect mule deer in two critical ways; directly through mortality caused by vehicle strikes, and indirectly through fragmentation of habitat that can keep mule deer from acquiring needed resources and reduce genetic interchange. Fenced highways fragment the habitat, disrupt seasonal and daily movements.

Effects of human disturbance on the nutritional ecology of mule deer Winter can be a challenging time for North American ungulates. As availability of food on summer ranges diminishes with accumulating snow, many ungulates in North America migrate to winter ranges to access available food.

Request PDF | Fragmentation of the Habitat of Wild Ungulates by Anthropogenic Barriers in Mongolia | Habitat loss and habitat fragmentation caused by. Migration is a critical life-history characteristic of ungulates that is at risk of disruption because of habitat loss and fragmentation, largely resulting from anthropogenic disturbances.

In some situations, the advantages acquired by migration could be outweighed by the risk, additional time, and energetic costs associated with avoidance of increased human development [5], [7], [18].

Impacts to elk and mule deer include direct loss of habitat, physiological stress, disturbance and displacement, habitat fragmentation and isolation, and disrupted migration (Watkins et al.

effect of fragmentation of suitable habitat on deer population density in relation to habitat quality for large carnivores like Panthera onca and Puma concolor. The first site, CAOBAS, is characterized by its rapidly increasing population and the consequently disappearance of potential habitat.

There is a massive hunting activity. The habitat varies largely due to the massive range of mule deer across western North America.

It can range from desert scrub land in the south to boreal forests and sub-arctic woodlands in north. Mule deer and whitetail deer habitats overlap in many areas which may be a major reason why mule deer habitat ranges north all the way to Alaska. elk (Mair ) but dominate mule deer (Hunter and Kinghorn ), and mule deer may dominate over white- tailed deer (Oducoileus virginianus) (AnthonyKramer ).

Although the effect of disturbance on the biology of wild ungulates has received. Mule Deer - Mortality/Non-Human-Predation. Coyotes are known as the most common predator of mule and black tailed deer. Mountain lions are another predator and show a high proficiency for taking adults down.

Common predators of fawns are black bears, bobcats, and golden eagles. Mule deer, as well with other deer species, have evolved a stomach with four chambers as used for rumination.

Rumination allows the animal to regurgitate the plant matter and re-chew it further aiding digestion. Mule deer eat on average 22 grams of dry plant matter per kilogram of body mass.

The ARPA contains two distinct mule deer winter ranges known as the Dad and Wild Horse winter ranges. The Dad winter range supports ~– mule deer, whereas the Wild Horse range supports ~– Population‐level migration routes for both winter ranges were identified in Cited by: The well-being of mule deer, now and in the future, rests with the condition of their habitats.

Habitat requirements of mule deer must be incorporated into land management plans so improvements to mule deer habitat can be made on a landscape scale as the rule rather than the exception.

The North American Mule Deer Conservation PlanFile Size: 3MB. Habitat selection by mule deer during migration: effects of landscape structure and natural-gas development. Habitat selection by mule deer during migration: effects of landscape structure and natural-gas development.

PATRICKE. LENDRUM, 1,CHARLESR. ANDERSON,JR.,2RYANA. LONG,1JOHNG. KIE,1 ANDR. TERRYBOWYER. We characterized sites (including 22 beds, 60 foraging and movement sites) used by red deerCervus elaphus xanthopygus Milne-Edwards, in the Wandashan Mountains, northeastern China in the winter period.

We used covariates for vegetation, topography, disturbances by other ungulates, and disturbance by humans to develop movement, forage and bed site resource Cited by: Habitat fragmentation creates landscapes made of altered habitats or developed areas fundamentally different from those shaped by natural disturbances that species have adapted to over evolutionary time (Noss and Cooperrider in Meffe et al.

Adverse effects of habitat fragmentation to both wildlife populations and species include. Subjects: Alberta Effect of habitat modification on Mule deer Oldman River Dam (Alta.) Oldman River Dam Region Oldman River Reservoir (Alta.) Wildlife habitat improvement Wildlife management Population ecology of mule deer with emphasis on potential impacts of gas and oil development along the east slope of the Rocky Mountains, northcentral Montana /.Our results indicate behavioral effects of energy development on mule deer.

are long term and may affect population abundance by displacing animals and. thereby functionally reducing the amount of available habitat.

KEYWORDS. avoidance behavior, disturbance, indirect habitat loss, land-use planning, by: Effects of underburning on habitat use by mule deer are not well‐understood and often assumed to be beneficial to deer, but empirical evidence to support this assumption is lacking. One way in which underburning may benefit mule deer is through enhanced forage quality and quantity, especially during winter (Pearson et al.

).Cited by: 1.